Teva gets FDA clearance for first EpiPen generics

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Teva gets FDA clearance for first EpiPen generics

By Sandra Levy - 08/16/2018
The Food and Drug Administration has approved the first generic of Mylan's EpiPen and EpiPen Jr. The FDA granted its approval to Teva for its 0.3- and 0.15-mg strength epinephrine auto-injectors for the emergency treatment of allergic reactions, including those that are life-threatening (anaphylaxis), in adults and pediatric patients who weigh more than 33 pounds.

“Today’s approval of the first generic version of the most-widely prescribed epinephrine auto-injector in the U.S. is part of our longstanding commitment to advance access to lower cost, safe and effective generic alternatives once patents and other exclusivities no longer prevent approval,” FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb, said, in a press statement. “This approval means patients living with severe allergies who require constant access to life-saving epinephrine should have a lower-cost option, as well as another approved product to help protect against potential drug shortages.”

Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency that affects the whole body and, in some cases, leads to death. This epinephrine injection (auto-injector) is intended for immediate administration to patients. When given intramuscularly or subcutaneously, it has a rapid onset and short duration of action. Epinephrine works by reducing swelling in the airway and increasing blood flow in the veins.

The EpiPen is intended to automatically inject a dose of epinephrine into a person’s thigh to stop an allergic reaction.

The FDA has approved several epinephrine auto-injector products under new drug applications to treat anaphylaxis, including EpiPen, Adrenaclick and Auvi-Q. In addition, authorized generic versions of EpiPen and Adrenaclick are marketed without the brand names.

An authorized generic is made under the brand name’s existing new drug application using the same formulation, process and manufacturing facilities that are used by the brand name manufacturer. The labeling or packaging is, however, changed to remove the brand name or other trade dress. In some cases, a company may choose to sell an authorized generic at a lower cost than the brand-name drug product.

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